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 Post Posted: Mon Mar 20, 2006 3:08 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 20, 2006 2:17 pm
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Hi Everyone, :P

I am new to this forum and also to working with polymer clay, so I am looking for advice.

I'm not keen on the idea of using the same oven for polymer clay and cooking food. I have read that a toaster oven can be used to fire polymer clay and I am considering buying the 'Hinari Lifestyle MO1600 Mini Oven' specifically for this purpose. The product description states that it "roasts, bakes, grills or toasts both sides simultaneously at 280oC. Alternatively, independent quartz element controls enable user to operate either top (160oC) or bottom (280oC) elements individually for efficiency".

My question is: - Will the oven only operate at these specific temperatures, i.e.; not higher or lower? Or are the temperatures stated, the highest the oven is capable of achieving, therefore enabling the user to choose any temperature beneath those given?

If anyone owns this particular model, I would be very grateful for any information. I have Emailed Hinari and am waiting for a reply but I would like to hear from someone who actually uses their oven for polymer clay work.

The oven is inexpensive, but I still don't want to waste money buying something that turns out to be unsuitable for the job. :cry: Thanks for reading. AquaGaia


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 Post Posted: Mon Mar 20, 2006 5:21 pm 
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Joined: Thu Oct 16, 2003 6:14 pm
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Location: gloucestershire, uk
All I will say is be really careful! I had a hinari toaster oven for polymer clay, set it to 120...left it for 5 mins...came back to find the whole lot on fire! It nearly took the washing machine with it too!

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Correna x


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 Post Posted: Mon Mar 20, 2006 7:47 pm 
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Hi Correna,

Oh my god! Thats horrific, and thanks for warning me. I once had a similar experience with a toaster so I'm aware of how easily a fire can be started. In fact, I am now questioning the wisdom of using one of these toaster ovens for anything, other than food.

I also posted on another board and I received a reply saying that in order to maintain the correct temperature, a lot of these ovens spike and get too hot for a short time and this isn't good for polyclay. Having read that as well as your reply, it seems there is a very real fire risk in using these appliances for baking polymer clay. :o

Just out of interest, was your oven the same model (MO1600) as the one I am interested in? Also, what sort of oven do you use now for your polymer clay work? Thanks for replying. AquaGaia


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 Post Posted: Mon Mar 20, 2006 8:19 pm 
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Location: gloucestershire, uk
just had a look at the box (still have it) and yes it is the same model...I knew that ovens can spike, and the reason I bought it was because it seemed to take a long time to cook in my normal oven even though it was fan assisted, and I have a parrot so wanted to cook it as far away as possible from him cos of potential fumes. I have since got a new oven and it is much better. I wouldn't have minded but it was being watched, only left it a few mins. Managed to unplug it quickly, and luckily my mums boyf was here and did the (stupid) hero bit, grabbed the oven and ran down the bottom of the garden with it, where I proceeded to throw water over it!
I have just bought a melt pot (made by ranger) because you can apparently cook it in there (albeit small pieces) although there doesn't seem to be instructions for it. Gonna have to do a bit of research!

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 Post Posted: Tue Mar 21, 2006 12:23 am 
 
Corenna, I do all my polyclay baking in my meltpot. Never managed to bake anything without burning otherwise! I was given the tip by a friend in the US a couple of years' ago - and now everyone seems to be doing it!

I've tried various recommendations, and the way that works for me is to use a project pan - I have one dedicated to clay to avoid contamination with anything else - work at full temperature and follow the clay guidelines for time. If you open the lid to check the piece, add five minutes.

It is worth putting a small piece of baking parchment under the piece to avoid it getting shiny where it rests on the bottom of the pan - this doesn't bother me as pretty much everything I do has a non-visible side in the finished piece, but would be relevant for some.

I'm pretty sure there's a piece about this in a recent issue of the Suze Weinberg newsletter.
hth


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 Post Posted: Tue Mar 21, 2006 12:43 am 
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Oh cool I have a melt pot and lots of Polymer clay and don't often play with it because of the cooking requirements. That might be more feasible - any chance of more etail??

Or links

Thanks

Rachel

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 Post Posted: Tue Mar 21, 2006 10:42 am 
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oooh that's excellent thank you!

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 Post Posted: Tue Mar 21, 2006 11:17 am 
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Thanks for the information Correna. I have received another reply to my post on a different board. This is what the lady wrote:-

"Don't touch it with a bargepole !!!!!! I tried one out a couple of months ago and managed to reduce some clay pieces to near charcoal ! If it doesn't have a timer or a tempreture setting don't bother with it. You'll have to go for one of the more expensive ovens (£ 60- 70 from somewhere like Argos) but it's a better investment, the fixed tempreture ovens are very unreliable".

I definitely won't be buying one of those then! By the sound of it she was lucky her's didn't burst into flames as well!

I am interested in the melt pot you mentioned and I'm looking into that now. Here is a link to the website for anyone else who is interested:- http://www.buycraftsonline.co.uk/acatal ... g_Pot.html

AquaGaia


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 Post Posted: Tue Mar 21, 2006 8:08 pm 
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I'm sure mine had adjustable temperature! Praps not then! Gonna try and get a project pan at the weekend, so I can keep one for clay and one for utee

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 Post Posted: Tue Mar 21, 2006 11:27 pm 
 
This is the best value (not just price but great service as well) I know in the UK:

http://www.craftathome.co.uk/product_in ... cts_id=667

Corenna, it is adjustable temperature - I have to say I rarely use anything other than hot - either the pot on its own for UTEE, or with a project pan for clay or beeswax (different pan, obviously). I've got another pan I use for chocolate as well.

There's some reference to clay baking here:

http://www.schmoozewithsuze.com/enews/02082006enews.htm

some samples from a Tim Holtz class shown here:

www.alteredbelly.blogspot.com

I do try to work in a reasonably ventilated place just in case of fumes, but I have yet to have a piece go wrong this way - though I still can't master translucent clay!

Give me a shout with any other specific questions and I'll see if I can help.


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 Post Posted: Tue Mar 21, 2006 11:48 pm 
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oooh all really helpful ta! I meant the oven being adjustable sorry not the melt pot! Might even brave baking something this week in ma pot!

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Correna x


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 Post Posted: Fri Apr 21, 2006 2:34 pm 
 
I have to jump in here with my 2 pence worth and say that I use nothing else but my toaster oven. It stis on top of my bookcase in my craft room and I cook everything in it.

My figurines are approx 5 inches high and I need to be very careful before I place them in the oven - hense the reason I wait at least 10 minutes before I put them in there. Once the bars have gone from red to black, I know its safe to put them in - plus I bake them for a good 40 minutes each time.

I'm at work so not sure on what make or model the oven is... my daughter gave it to me and its something that I would be totally lost if I did not have it.

Pauline :)


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